Pineapple Express RV Park Damage Report:

IMG_8286You may have heard, we had a big storm here last night.  Friends and family texted with concerns for our well being.  We survived!  Our Christmas bow blew off of our door. Thankfully this was the most damage we sustained. We were under a Red Alert for wind and flash flooding.  I have heard that there was much worse damage in other areas around L.A.

Last night we were down in the valley having dinner with friends and meeting up with more friends for a birthday party.  We knew a storm was coming, the wind was picking up and wet stuff was starting to fall from the sky.  Rob was getting anxious to get home.  We left Toluca Lake around 10:50.  Driving through the mountains on the 5, our ride home was both rainy and windy. As soon as we reached our RV, we very quickly cleaned off our porch area and brought in the awning as to avoid damage and reduce the number of potential projectiles outside.

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For those of you not familiar with RVs here are some terms you need to know:   

Awning – Most RVs have electrical awnings these days and you can put them out and take them in with the press of a button.

Pitch – You “pitch” your awning by pulling one arm of it down so that it is slanted.  You do this so that when it rains, the water runs off instead of filling up the awning and causing it to break. Pro tip: Always leave your awning a little pitched, it could rain while you are away.

Add-A-Room – tent-like “walls” that you can purchase to make an extra room on your RV using your awning.

IMG_8291These people seem to have weathered the storm by pitching their add-a-room and awning on an extreme slant.  I imagine that it would be rather difficult to disassemble an add-a-room quickly.  I bet it made a lot of noise flapping in the wind last night.

The storm seemed to reach its most turbulent between 2:30am and 4:00am.  It was enough to wake me up and then make me concerned enough to wake Rob up too.  We were really glad that we had pulled in our awning.  I asked Rob if we had any kind of “emergency plan.” He said no.  We argued for a while and then went back to bed.

You might wonder what it is like to be in an RV during a storm… RVs are made to travel down the road at about 65 mph, so they can handle quite a bit of wind.  It is shaky though.  The whole camper moves from side to side in windy conditions.  We are on shocks after all.  It is disconcerting, but you get used to it.  

Where our RV is parked, we are mostly shielded from the wind by other RVs.  There were flash flood warnings in our area which were some cause for concern as we have creeks running both behind and in front of our campground.  These normally dry creeks had quite a flow going but thankfully it never reached a danger point for us. It was quite beautiful to see water flowing this morning.IMG_8262 IMG_8271We took a walk around our park this morning under the now clear blue sky to check out the creek and see if there was any damage around the park. Some of our neighbors were not as lucky with the wind and had their awnings destroyed.  Pro Tip: If it is windy, bring your awning in!  IMG_8276

IMG_8284There were some interesting “RV Park engineering” situations happening with people who seemed to have leaks.  One person used painters tape to secure plastic to his or her roof.

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